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Study finds that early childhood language skills can lead to school success

A new study, led by researchers at the University of Washington in collaboration with Rebecca Alper, assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, and colleagues from the College of Liberal Arts, looked at a comprehensive set of school readiness skills in order to try to determine which is the most solid predictor of a child’s later success. Researchers from the University of Delaware and the University of North Carolina also contributed to the project.

Posted:  June 28, 2018

Photos: NMS Research Consortium home to one-of-a-kind collaborative space

The College of Public Health's Neuromotor Science (NMS) Research Consortium is an interdisciplinary research facility that for the past four years has brought together nine faculty members and 20 students from various disciplines ranging from kinesiology and physical therapy to neuroscience and bioengineering. The labs investigate basic and clinical issues in human sensorimotor neuroscience, such as upper extremity function, posture and gait, spinal cord function, concussion, sensorimotor integration and assistive device development.

Posted:  January 19, 2018

Explore Our 2017 Year in Review

The past year has challenged us like few others in recent memory. In the face of proliferating threats to our collective well-being—from the opioid and obesity epidemics to unprecedented natural disasters—many of the most innovative solutions are emerging from our institutions of public health research and education.

Our digital Year In Review magazine includes top stories from across the Temple University College of Public Health in the past year:

Posted:  January 17, 2018

New Social and Behavioral Sciences study examines links between depression and risks for unintended pregnancy

Unintended pregnancy is prevalent, complex and costly. According to the Guttmacher Institute, 40 percent of pregnancies in the U.S. today are unintended. Many such pregnancies are associated with depression, substance abuse and delays in prenatal care, and, in 2010, public health services spent nearly $13 billion on unintended pregnancies.

Posted:  December 13, 2017

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