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Dean Siminoff, Heather Gardiner receive $1.5 million Department of Defense grant to explore promising form of transplantation

Temple ROTC students on an exercise in Fort Dix, New JerseyMore than 1,600 service members from the conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria have experienced devastating battle injuries—the loss of a face, for instance, or limbs, hands or feet—according to a 2015 report from the Congressional Research Service. While some veterans are treated through a combination of prosthetics and physical therapy, a new form of transplantation could help provide a new face or hands for those who experience particularly catastrophic blast injuries.

Posted:  October 8, 2018

Training a different kind of dentist

A child receives a dental exam. For a child, a visit to the dentist is a routine affair: Playing with toys or coloring in the waiting area, a gentle call back to see the dentist, growing anxiety as the tools are prepared, and a series of questions: “Have you been brushing? Have you been flossing?” Then, the dentist asks about the child’s diet and has them step on the scale.

Posted:  September 28, 2018

The gaps in athletic training education

Athletic Training classroomWith the continued prominence of the #MeToo movement in acknowledging the prevalence of workplace assault, the past year has been a watershed moment for holding accountable perpetrators of sexual harassment, assault and coercion. In Pennsylvania, a bombshell grand jury report in August brought allegations of more than 1,000 instances of sexual assault of children by Catholic priests. And late in 2017, former USA Gymnastics physician Larry Nassar was convicted of 10 counts of criminal sexual conduct after being accused by more than 250 women.

Posted:  September 24, 2018

Martinez, Muñoz-Laboy begin first federally funded study of Medical Legal Partnerships

While public health practitioners and social workers know that the social determinants of health—social and economic factors such as where and how people work and live—influence both individual and population health as much as any other factors, healthcare and social service providers often aren’t equipped to meet those needs.

Posted:  August 28, 2018

New study aims to help patients gain a better understanding of end-stage renal disease

Megan Urbanski, a doctoral student pursuing her PhD in Social and Behavioral Sciences at the college, received the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award, a two-year pre-doctoral fellowship from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to study the treatment decision-making preferences of people diagnosed with kidney failure, or end-stage renal disease (ESRD).

Posted:  August 28, 2018

Clinical-community collaboration may help reduce pediatric obesity, study finds

In a study published in the April issue of Childhood Obesity, Gina Tripicchio, assistant professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences, and a team of researchers evaluated a program that enrolled 46 children aged 2-16 years (most of whom are Hispanic) with overweight or obesity (BMI greater than the 85th percentile) into a family-based behavioral group (FBBG) treatment program.

Posted:  August 27, 2018

Hoping to improve sanitation worldwide, Murphy receives college’s first Gates Foundation grant

The UN estimates that, by 2050, one in four people will live in a country with shortages of fresh water. As it is now, nearly 2 billion people use water sources that are contaminated with fecal matter. The situation is dire: more children die from diarrheal diseases than often-discussed illnesses such as malaria.

Posted:  July 27, 2018

Study finds that early childhood language skills can lead to school success

A new study, led by researchers at the University of Washington in collaboration with Rebecca Alper, assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, and colleagues from the College of Liberal Arts, looked at a comprehensive set of school readiness skills in order to try to determine which is the most solid predictor of a child’s later success. Researchers from the University of Delaware and the University of North Carolina also contributed to the project.

Posted:  June 28, 2018

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